Saturday, May 12, 2012

Congratulations!

Great work this semester!  Congratulations on some amazing final projects.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Final Portfolios and Review: May 11

Your review will be a digital portfolio. You will turn in a folder of images documenting all the semester assignments.  On review day, you are required to be in the computer room during your time slot.  Reviews will occur individually in the studio room.

Digital Portfolio Requirements:
Check the class gallery to get a visual and title for each assignment.  Also include your final project.  Include the final pattern, project sheet and the piece.
1. Photograph your studio projects. Re-size your digital projects.
2. Format images in photoshop by cropping the background.
3. Change the image size to 72 pixels per inch with dimensions no larger then 800 x 600 pixels.
4. Save in jpeg format.
5. Label each with your name and the assignment name.  For example:  AnetteMillington_DesignStudies.jpg
6. Save the files to a folder labeled with your first and last name.  
7. Bring on a drive to class to load to the drop box.

Review Schedule:
Section W
9:00 - 9:30:  Agrima, Kyla, Nelson, Tess
9:30 - 10:00:  Carmen, Paul, Carolina
10:00 - 10:30:  Patrice, Disha, Adriana, Lilly
10:30 - 11:00:  Kendall, Elisabeth, Matthew 
11:00 - 11:30:  Shuyu, Olivia, Phillip
Section U
3:00 - 3:30:  Elysia, Carla, Luna, Callie
3:30 - 4:00:  Helen, Yong Jae, Tamara
4:00 - 4:30:  Aram, Nova, Sangtea, Kathryn
4:30 - 5:00:  Sienna, Thea, David 
5:00 - 5:30:  Brigitte, Danielle, Hongwei

Thursday, April 5, 2012

Body Armor Final Project: Due May 8

Your final project will include the following:

1.  Concept
  • Determine a unique and clear concept for a piece of body armor.  This means that you will determine a "force" that the armor protects the user from and that all other design choices will stem from this concept.  
  • Think of a concept that is relevant to contemporary life.  Past student projects have protected the user from practical or conceptual forces.   Projects may be useful, personal, political, deadly serious or comical.  Armor has been designed to protect the user from physical violence, weather, a broken heart, one's own mind,  dreams, and gossip.
2. Research
  • Find one historical "inspiration" piece at the Metropolitan Museum.  This piece must relate to your concept (not only be visually interesting).  For example, if your piece will protect the user from weather, then your historical example must also protect from weather. 
  • Find a literary, news or pop culture reference for your concept.  For example if you are protecting the user from violence against women, you could download a related article.  If you are protecting the user from a broken heart, you could find a related poem or song.  You are building the case that the user needs your armor.
2.  2D Pattern
  • This pattern must start with an image, a pattern unit or a point group and repeat in a planner structure.  You may choose any structure that we have studied. 
  • Design a color group for your pattern related to your concept.
  • The presentation of the pattern may be painted or digital. 
  • For a Digital Pattern turn in a 11 in x 17 in color print, mount on illustration board. 
  • For a Painted Pattern turn in a 11 in x 14 in painting, on board or canvas.
3.    Armor in 3-D
  • Make a wearable piece that is 3D and can fit on a dress form or a model.
  • The piece must be covered with the pattern.  The pattern does not need to cover the entire form, but should be applied with care.  Other colors and materials should relate to the concept and your palette.
  • Past approaches to building the piece have included: Creating an armature out of wire, wood, paper, plaster and then covering the armature with a patterned material.  Sewing a patterned material.  Building with a sturdy patterned material.
  • Past approaches to transfer the pattern onto the piece have included:  Working with digital printouts that are manipulated, coated in mat medium, or covered in plastic sheeting.  Transferring pattern onto cloth with iron-on transfer paper.  Hand painting pattern on a surface.  Screen printing pattern on a surface.
4.  Photoshop Project Sheet
  • Photograph your 3-D piece.  The photo must show the piece on a dress form or a model, be well lit and edited.
  • A title for your product.
  • A swatch of the 2D pattern.
  • A statement of purpose that references your historical inspiration and your literary, news or pop culture reference.
  • Make the layout and type relate to the concept of your overall project.  
  • Printout a 11 in x 17 in color print, mount on illustration board.
Student Examples:















Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Met Trip April 10 & Homework Due April 13

We will meet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for class on April 10th.  Meet me in the lobby near the information desk.

Section W Meet at 9:30 am.
Section U Meet at 3:30 pm.

Prior to Visit/ Homework:  Determine a unique and clear concept for a piece of body armor.  This means that you will determine a "force" that the armor protects the user from and that all other design choices will stem from this concept. 

At the Museum:   Find one historical "inspiration" piece at the Metropolitan Museum.  This piece must relate to your concept (not only be visually interesting).  For example, if your piece will protect the user from weather, then your historical example must also protect from weather. You will begin in the Arms & Armor section and then explore other cultures. Sketch your object from 3 angles.  Photograph your object.  Transcribe the label so that you may research the object further.

Post Visit Homework Due 4/13: 
  • Do some online research about your inspiration piece.  Look for more information about the time period, culture and use.  Bring printed articles or notes to class. 
  • Find a literary, news or pop culture reference for your concept.  For example if you are protecting the user from violence against women, you could download a related article.  If you are protecting the user from a broken heart, you could find a related poem or song.  You are building the case that the user needs your armor.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Pattern+Armor+Fashion Design

Checkout the designs by Alexander McQueen, included in the Met's "Super Heros: Fashion and Fantasy" Exhibition, 2008.  Comment below on the main concept of the designs and how each uses pattern.


Pattern + Armor

The use of pattern to add visual movement and symbolic meaning to objects is readily seen in body armor.  Meant to protect the body in battle, from natural elements or the supernatural, world cultures have long created armor for the body.

Check out the role of pattern and color in the collection of armor below, photographed at the Met.

  • What does the piece of armor protect the wearer from?  
  • Where is patterned applied?  
  • How does the pattern change the formal elements of the armor?  
  • How does the pattern change the meaning of the armor?  
  • What pattern structures do you notice; point groups, line groups, plane groups?


Horse Armor/ German

Armor Detail/ German

Armor/ English

Armor/ English

Shield/German

Hand Armor/ German

Armor/ Japan

Sword and Sheath/ Yoruba

Parka/ Eskimo

Body Costume/ Pacific Northwest

Crown and Ear Flares/ Peru

Nose Ornament/ Columbia

Mask/ Kenyah

Mask/ Bwa

Surface Design

The next bridge we make is to move from planner pattern to pattern in the round.  Pattern is used to cover the surfaces of sculpture, objects and clothing.  Pattern on form functions as an additional layer of movement, structure and meaning.

The questions we confront when placing pattern on form include:

  • What are the formal qualities of the 3-D object?  How might the pattern echo or contrast these?
  • What is the visual point of emphasis, the pattern or the 3-D form?
  • Why add pattern?  How does a repeating 2-D pattern change the 3-D form?
  • How does the pattern design relate to the use and meaning of the 3-D object?

Friday, March 9, 2012

Image + Pattern Painting Project: Research Stage Due 3/23

1. Design a composition that combines a found contemporary or historical pattern with an image of a portrait, landscape or object.

2.  The combination of image and pattern should express a narrative, or make a political or social comment.

3.  Take an original photo for your image subject.  Photograph or scan the pattern.  Save as jpegs.

4.  Develop a sketches of your composition ideas.

5.  Write a paragraph explaining the meaning behind your juxtaposition.

6.  FYI: It is suggested that final piece will be 18 x 24 in or 20 x 30 in.  It is suggested to use acrylic on canvas. (If you have another size, paint or surface in mind check-in with your idea).  The due date for the final piece will be April 6.  

Student Examples
 

Friday, March 2, 2012

Response Writing: Pattern in Paint

Review the work of Klimt, Wiley and Greene.  Respond in writing in a comment below.

Discuss how each artist uses pattern in the painting.  Why is pattern added to the image?  What is the relationship of the image and the pattern?  What is the visual effect?  What is the conceptual effect?  Which artist do you find to be most interesting?  Why?

Pattern in Painting

Pattern has inspired painters interested in both the visual form of pattern and the role pattern plays in culture.  The paintings below weave pattern into image form, overlay image with pattern and create unique imagery from pattern combinations.

Gustav Klimt

Kehinde Wiley



Kira Greene





Friday, February 24, 2012

Flavor Paper Trip

We will be meeting Tuesday Feb 28 at Flavor Paper, located at 216 Pacific Street Brooklyn, NY 11201.  (Check your email before departing in case of any last minute changes.)

Section W will meet at 10 am sharp.
Section U will meet at 4 pm sharp.

Visit the website for directions and to preview the design company.

Color Variations in Collections

Design color choices are both conceptual and formal.  Check out the patterns below, same design with different color choices.  Notice that on a conceptual level the color creates a mood.  On a formal level all the patterns use WARM/COOL, INTENSE/NEUTRAL, & LIGHT/DARK relationships.

Dominic Crimson Design
Joy Collection Design
Lotta Kuhlhorn Design

Fire/Water/Air/Earth Pattern Project: Collection Book Due March 9 Due 3/9

1.  One mounted print of your favorite pattern. 11 in x 17 in.  Also save a jpeg version or pdf version of this one pattern and bring it to load to the drop box.

2.  Now the real challenge:  A presentation style swatch book for your collection!
  • You will make a small flip book.  Each page will be 4 in vertical and 11 in horizontal.  
  • It is suggested that each page will be printed and then mounted on thin illustration board, or heavy bristol board.  Each page will have a hole punched in the top left corner.  All pages will be joined with a binding ring.
  • If you would like to be creative with binding, printing on alternative materials like card stock or acetate feel free.  Just make it wow.
  • The first page will be a title page.  Name your collection, thoughtfully.  Give it a great font.  Put it over a pattern or one of your inspirational images.  (Remember to cite any sources that are not original.)
  • The second page will be a statement of your collection.  Write in a professional tone.  Talk up your design concept as if you are marketing it to a design group.  What is the inspiration of your pattern design, your color group?  To what setting would this pattern be applied?
  • The third page is your color group of 6 swatches.  Maybe include a part of one of your inspirational photos.  
  • The next pages will showcase your patterns.  You will have 2 color variations of each of your 15 planer patterns.  This equals 30 pattern pages!
  • The last 8 pages will show a  mock-photo of each pattern in a place or on a design object.  For example photograph a building or room where you think your pattern belongs and super-impose your pattern in photo shop.  Or sketch an item or garment made out of your pattern.  For example draw a dress design in one of your patterns and scan.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Fire/Water/Earth/Air Pattern Project: Plane Groups Due 2/24

1.  Create a series of patterns.  Select three of your point groups or line group sections to be the three main units.
2.  For each unit you will create a p1, pg, c2mm, p31mm, and p4mm pattern.  This means you are making 15 patterns. Work at the scale of 11 in x 17 in.
3.  Bring the patterns %30 complete as digital files.
4.  Print one pattern or pattern swatch on the pro color printer to test your palette.

Materials to Bring:
1.  All digital files.

Plane Groups

The moment we have been waiting for.... full on planer pattern!

There are 17 plane groups that multiply motifs across a plane.  We will focus on a small selection of the 17 plane groups:  p1, pg, c2mm, p31mm and p4mm.  Below are the the letter b examples, based on the letter b point group and line group examples.  Followed by examples of the Persian Comma Motif and other historical works taken from Peter Steven's Handbook of Regular Patterns.

p1

pg

c2mm

p31m

p4mm