Saturday, May 12, 2012

Congratulations!

Great work this semester!  Congratulations on some amazing final projects.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Final Portfolios and Review: May 11

Your review will be a digital portfolio. You will turn in a folder of images documenting all the semester assignments.  On review day, you are required to be in the computer room during your time slot.  Reviews will occur individually in the studio room.

Digital Portfolio Requirements:
Check the class gallery to get a visual and title for each assignment.  Also include your final project.  Include the final pattern, project sheet and the piece.
1. Photograph your studio projects. Re-size your digital projects.
2. Format images in photoshop by cropping the background.
3. Change the image size to 72 pixels per inch with dimensions no larger then 800 x 600 pixels.
4. Save in jpeg format.
5. Label each with your name and the assignment name.  For example:  AnetteMillington_DesignStudies.jpg
6. Save the files to a folder labeled with your first and last name.  
7. Bring on a drive to class to load to the drop box.

Review Schedule:
Section W
9:00 - 9:30:  Agrima, Kyla, Nelson, Tess
9:30 - 10:00:  Carmen, Paul, Carolina
10:00 - 10:30:  Patrice, Disha, Adriana, Lilly
10:30 - 11:00:  Kendall, Elisabeth, Matthew 
11:00 - 11:30:  Shuyu, Olivia, Phillip
Section U
3:00 - 3:30:  Elysia, Carla, Luna, Callie
3:30 - 4:00:  Helen, Yong Jae, Tamara
4:00 - 4:30:  Aram, Nova, Sangtea, Kathryn
4:30 - 5:00:  Sienna, Thea, David 
5:00 - 5:30:  Brigitte, Danielle, Hongwei

Thursday, April 5, 2012

Body Armor Final Project: Due May 8

Your final project will include the following:

1.  Concept
  • Determine a unique and clear concept for a piece of body armor.  This means that you will determine a "force" that the armor protects the user from and that all other design choices will stem from this concept.  
  • Think of a concept that is relevant to contemporary life.  Past student projects have protected the user from practical or conceptual forces.   Projects may be useful, personal, political, deadly serious or comical.  Armor has been designed to protect the user from physical violence, weather, a broken heart, one's own mind,  dreams, and gossip.
2. Research
  • Find one historical "inspiration" piece at the Metropolitan Museum.  This piece must relate to your concept (not only be visually interesting).  For example, if your piece will protect the user from weather, then your historical example must also protect from weather. 
  • Find a literary, news or pop culture reference for your concept.  For example if you are protecting the user from violence against women, you could download a related article.  If you are protecting the user from a broken heart, you could find a related poem or song.  You are building the case that the user needs your armor.
2.  2D Pattern
  • This pattern must start with an image, a pattern unit or a point group and repeat in a planner structure.  You may choose any structure that we have studied. 
  • Design a color group for your pattern related to your concept.
  • The presentation of the pattern may be painted or digital. 
  • For a Digital Pattern turn in a 11 in x 17 in color print, mount on illustration board. 
  • For a Painted Pattern turn in a 11 in x 14 in painting, on board or canvas.
3.    Armor in 3-D
  • Make a wearable piece that is 3D and can fit on a dress form or a model.
  • The piece must be covered with the pattern.  The pattern does not need to cover the entire form, but should be applied with care.  Other colors and materials should relate to the concept and your palette.
  • Past approaches to building the piece have included: Creating an armature out of wire, wood, paper, plaster and then covering the armature with a patterned material.  Sewing a patterned material.  Building with a sturdy patterned material.
  • Past approaches to transfer the pattern onto the piece have included:  Working with digital printouts that are manipulated, coated in mat medium, or covered in plastic sheeting.  Transferring pattern onto cloth with iron-on transfer paper.  Hand painting pattern on a surface.  Screen printing pattern on a surface.
4.  Photoshop Project Sheet
  • Photograph your 3-D piece.  The photo must show the piece on a dress form or a model, be well lit and edited.
  • A title for your product.
  • A swatch of the 2D pattern.
  • A statement of purpose that references your historical inspiration and your literary, news or pop culture reference.
  • Make the layout and type relate to the concept of your overall project.  
  • Printout a 11 in x 17 in color print, mount on illustration board.
Student Examples:















Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Met Trip April 10 & Homework Due April 13

We will meet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for class on April 10th.  Meet me in the lobby near the information desk.

Section W Meet at 9:30 am.
Section U Meet at 3:30 pm.

Prior to Visit/ Homework:  Determine a unique and clear concept for a piece of body armor.  This means that you will determine a "force" that the armor protects the user from and that all other design choices will stem from this concept. 

At the Museum:   Find one historical "inspiration" piece at the Metropolitan Museum.  This piece must relate to your concept (not only be visually interesting).  For example, if your piece will protect the user from weather, then your historical example must also protect from weather. You will begin in the Arms & Armor section and then explore other cultures. Sketch your object from 3 angles.  Photograph your object.  Transcribe the label so that you may research the object further.

Post Visit Homework Due 4/13: 
  • Do some online research about your inspiration piece.  Look for more information about the time period, culture and use.  Bring printed articles or notes to class. 
  • Find a literary, news or pop culture reference for your concept.  For example if you are protecting the user from violence against women, you could download a related article.  If you are protecting the user from a broken heart, you could find a related poem or song.  You are building the case that the user needs your armor.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Pattern+Armor+Fashion Design

Checkout the designs by Alexander McQueen, included in the Met's "Super Heros: Fashion and Fantasy" Exhibition, 2008.  Comment below on the main concept of the designs and how each uses pattern.


Pattern + Armor

The use of pattern to add visual movement and symbolic meaning to objects is readily seen in body armor.  Meant to protect the body in battle, from natural elements or the supernatural, world cultures have long created armor for the body.

Check out the role of pattern and color in the collection of armor below, photographed at the Met.

  • What does the piece of armor protect the wearer from?  
  • Where is patterned applied?  
  • How does the pattern change the formal elements of the armor?  
  • How does the pattern change the meaning of the armor?  
  • What pattern structures do you notice; point groups, line groups, plane groups?


Horse Armor/ German

Armor Detail/ German

Armor/ English

Armor/ English

Shield/German

Hand Armor/ German

Armor/ Japan

Sword and Sheath/ Yoruba

Parka/ Eskimo

Body Costume/ Pacific Northwest

Crown and Ear Flares/ Peru

Nose Ornament/ Columbia

Mask/ Kenyah

Mask/ Bwa

Surface Design

The next bridge we make is to move from planner pattern to pattern in the round.  Pattern is used to cover the surfaces of sculpture, objects and clothing.  Pattern on form functions as an additional layer of movement, structure and meaning.

The questions we confront when placing pattern on form include:

  • What are the formal qualities of the 3-D object?  How might the pattern echo or contrast these?
  • What is the visual point of emphasis, the pattern or the 3-D form?
  • Why add pattern?  How does a repeating 2-D pattern change the 3-D form?
  • How does the pattern design relate to the use and meaning of the 3-D object?